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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 22-26

A study to compare the correlation of perceived stress and insomnia between health professionals and other employees in a government medical college of Eastern India


Department of Physiology, Burdwan Medical College, Burdwan, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Arunima Chaudhuri
Krishnasayar South, Borehat, Burdwan - 713 102, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cmi.cmi_88_21

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Background: Perception of higher stress may lead to insomnia which can adversely affect the mental and physical well-being of health professionals and patient care. The aim of the study was to compare the correlation of perceived stress and insomnia among health professionals and other employees in a Government Medical College of Eastern India. Materials and Methods: This online survey was conducted using two Google forms in a span of 18 months. In the first section of the document, the relevance was explained, and informed consent was taken. In the second part of the form, participants were asked to fill up demographic details and relevant history. In the third part of the form, participants had to fill up the following four scales: Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) of Sheldon Cohen, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). Results: Participants were divided into two groups: Group A: Health Professionals and Group B: Other Employees. JSS scores were significantly higher among Group A (38.29 ± 6.34) as compared to Group B (35.47 ± 6.98) with a P = 0.0008**. Participants having higher JSS scores also had higher PSS scores (Group A with an r = 0.12; Group B with an r = 0.007). ISI scores were significantly higher in Group A (10.53 ± 3.43) as compared to Group B (6.21 ± 2.77) with a P < 0.001**. Participants having higher PSS scores also had higher scores for ISI (Group A with an r = 0.167 and Group B with an r = 0.333). PSQI scores were significantly higher among Group A (11.52 ± 2.05) as compared to Group B (6.37 ± 2.69) with a P < 0.0001**. PSS scores also positively correlated to PSQI scores (Group A, r = 0.963 and Group B r = 0.959). Participants having higher PSS scores also had higher scores for PSQI (Group A with an r = 0.963 and Group B with an r = 0.959). Conclusions: Perceived stress scores positively correlated to both severities of insomnia and poor quality of sleep among study participants. This suggests that higher perceived stress levels may be a significant contributor to insomnia and poor sleep quality among health professions as they are constantly exposed to higher professional stress in the present health-care system.


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